Leukemia Survivor Stories

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Mom Of 12 Year Old Leukemia Survivor Shares Her Journey

12 Year Old Leukemia Survivor

“Always believe!!!”

Kay was diagnosed with Leukemia in December, 2017. She has successfully defeated her disease. She was just 12 years old when she was diagnosed with ALL.
 
The Diagnosis
 
Leukemia Survivor's Journey

“In December 2017, 4 days before Christmas, my 12 year old daughter was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia. We learned after the 30 days of induction that her leukaemia was not responding to traditional chemo. After 71 days, she was discharged and began her journey with CAR T Cell immunotherapy. After CAR T therapy, we were in the hospital for 41 days. She achieved remission and was able to move forward with her bone marrow transplant. As of 8/28/18 we have been in the hospital for 32 days and she did well so far. She has had some really hard days, but is truly a warrior.”

The Journey

“It has been hard and not a day goes by we are not faced with the reminder of cancer and that can change your life in a blink of an eye. Once we learned she qualified for transplant, we had a hard time finding her a donor with the HLA type she needed. After searching, we decided to go with cord blood and we have so far been successful.”

Motivation to fight cancer

“Fighting for all the other little warriors who have lost their battle with cancer!”

Biggest hindrance

“Not being able to be home with family and friends.”

Message to other cancer patients

Message for cancer patients
“Always have faith and never stop believing!”

Leukemia Survivor Thanks Cancer For Teaching Life Lessons

Leukemia Survivor Thanks Cancer For Teaching Life Lessons
 
“I am not thankful for cancer but I am thankful for what cancer has taught me.”
 
Brett Conley was diagnosed with Leukemia on 14 February 2018. She has successfully defeated her disease.
 
The Diagnosis
 
leukemia survivor diagnosis
“I was diagnosed on 14th February 2018 with Leukaemia ALL B Cell Philadelphia Positive. I went to the see a local GP after feeling unwell for about a month; however, I didn’t think my symptoms were all that serious. My symptom were a cold with a barking cough, night sweats which became continuous throughout the day as time progressed, a faint purple dotted rash on my chest and legs, fatigue, muscle soreness, heavy menstrual period and random nose and mouth bleeds. Once I explained these symptoms to the GP, he urged me to go straight to Emergency as there was likely something with my platelets. He explained it could be ITP but Lymphoma or Leukaemia were also a possibilities given my symptoms. I went straight to ER and a simple blood tests there showed that I had Leukaemia, given that my WBC 112 and platelets were 16.”
 
The Journey
 
“I was a perfectly healthy and fit 26 year old female with no prior medical history. Prior to Leukaemia, I had never even been admitted to hospital! I’m fortunate enough to being treated at one of the leading hospital in Australia for Leukaemia and so far my treatment and recovery has been as good as could be expected. While Leukaemia is a horrible disease, it can be a “manageable and curable” cancer (in the words of my Haematologist). So some days I feel very fortunate to have this disease. I was given a 70% chance of survival at the time of diagnosis and I was pretty happy with those odds! I was treated with the GRAAPH2005 protocol (a reduced chemo intensity adult protocol). I achieved complete molecular remission after the induction phase. Despite responding perfectly to the chemo with no complications, it was decided that I would automatically progress to a stem cell transplant. My medical team said that while ALL has high relapse rate, it was quite possible that it would never come back due to my response to treatment; however, they wanted to ensure that it never does come back and I’m free to get on with my life. In May 2018 in between chemo treatments, I had an oophorectomy so that one of my ovaries could be removed and cryopreserved. It is hoped that one day I will be able to use my ovarian tissue, via IVF, to conceive. I found the potential loss of my fertility very difficult to deal with as it was something I had always taken for granted. The path to transplant was not smooth sailing. I had a unrelated German donor who was ruled unfit to donate 10 days prior to my transplant admission in May 2018 and had to wait an additional 8 weeks for another suitable donor in the US to become available. I spent 36 days in hospital for my transplant with the majority of that being confined to the isolation of my room. I had full myeloablative conditioning (Chemo and radiation) for my transplant. During my transplant I experienced diarrhoea, fatigue, mucositis, an infection and was place on assisted feeding. I also had Acute GVHD of the skin and was put on high dose steroids. Since my discharge, my medical team have confirmed that I am 100% donor cells (chimerism test) and 0.00% BCR-ABL. I’m now day 60 days post-transplant and everything is going well. While a transplant is considered a risky procedure, I feel fortunate that I’m now in the recovery phase of my journey 7 months post diagnosis. I hope to return to work by December 2018/January 2019 on a part time basis.”
 
Motivation to fight cancer
 
“I didn’t think I ever really thought I had a choice. It was just the next obstacle in my life that I was going to overcome.”
 
Biggest hindrance
 
“When my German donor fell through I felt lost and unsure about the next phase of my treatment and transplant but my medical team was very reassuring. I was always reassured that they had plan B, C and D available. Fortunately, a 10/10 unrelated donor came through and we never had to explore those options.”
 
Message to other cancer patients
 
leukemia survivor message to other cancer patients
“As everyone says, you really do need to take it one day at a time and be grateful for the good days when you have them. Just because you have cancer, doesn’t automatically mean that you are unhappy. I’ve had some really enjoyable times in the past 7 months. I’ve continued to love life throughout my treatment.”

Leukemia Survivor Shares Her Journey

leukemia survivor
 
“Life is a very precious gift. And unfortunately, you don’t truly realize it until you are fighting to stay alive.”
 
Tiffani was diagnosed with leukemia on January 13, 2014. She has successfully defeated her disease. She is a baseball lover.
 
The Diagnosis “January 13, 2014. My body was covered in bruises and I was too weak to stand. I went to the ER and was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic Leukemia a few hours later.”
 
The Journey
 
leukemia survivor's journey
“I was diagnosed with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia on January 13, 2014. It is a subtype of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and is pretty rare. The day I was diagnosed was a scary day. I was too weak to stand and my body was covered in bruises, quite literally. It was a scary sight and you would have wondered why I even waited to go to the hospital if I looked like that. And the truth is, I was scared. I knew in my heart something was terribly wrong and google told me it was leukemia, but I didn’t want it to be true. But when I woke up that morning and I couldn’t even stand in the shower, I knew it was time. My journey was rough and long. Before I started chemo I was told I might not be able to have children afterward. It broke me. I was in and out of the hospital for 6 months, staying 30+ days each time I was admitted to the hospital. I had to overcome a lot of things that cancer and chemo had done to me. I had heart failure, blood infection, c-diff, bleeding in my brain and right eye, extremely high blood pressure, weight loss, and water in my lungs. I was admitted to ICU twice during my hospital stays. Luckily, I was in remission after just my first round of chemo. I went through 3 more rounds of chemo after the first. I overcame all the things cancer and chemo did to me and was discharged from the hospital for the last time on June 30, 2014. One year later I married the love of my life and on our honeymoon we conceived our miracle baby.”
 
Motivation to fight cancer
 
“My boyfriend who is now my husband and my family.”
 
Message to other cancer patients
 
Message for cancer patients
“Stay positive. No matter what! Sometimes things get so dark and you might be thinking there’s no way out, but you have to think positive! It worked for me.”

Leukemia Fighter Working To Raise Awareness And Inspire Others

Leukemia Fighter Working To Raise Awareness
 
“We can’t direct the wind, but we can direct the sails.”
 
Assia was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2017. She is 20-year-old cancer patient hoping to raise awareness and inspire hope into the hearts of those also fighting cancer.
 
The Diagnosis
 
“The story of my diagnosis is a strange one. I was lying on my bed during the summer of 2016 when I noticed that there was some hyperpigmentation on my stomach. I did not pay much attention to it and after showing it to my mum, we thought it was probably just normal considering my skin tone. Fast forward a few months later and we noticed that it had spread all over my back and thighs. I visited the doctors, where I had a blood test. The results showed nothing alarming and so I assumed nothing was wrong with me. However, the pigmentation spread further and by the beginning of 2017 I had noticed that I was constantly exhausted, I lost my breath easily and quickly, I was waking up every morning with severe muscle cramps. Sometimes the muscle cramps in my legs were so severe that it hurt to walk. After seeing several doctors I was referred to a dermatologist at the hospital. On the day of my skin biopsy, I had a blood test which revealed some abnormalities. I was referred to a haematologist. A month later I had a bone marrow biopsy and two weeks later I was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. It was unexpected for everyone around me, however, for some reason, I had sensed that it was coming.”
 
The Journey
Leukemia Fighter's Journey
Assia was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2017. She is 20-year-old cancer patient hoping to raise awareness and inspire hope into the hearts of those also fighting cancer. “The story of my diagnosis is a strange one. I was lying on my bed during the summer of 2016 when I noticed that there was some hyperpigmentation on my stomach. I did not pay much attention to it and after showing it to my mum, we thought it was probably just normal considering my skin tone. Fast forward a few months later and we noticed that it had spread all over my back and thighs. I visited the doctors, where I had a blood test. The results showed nothing alarming and so I assumed nothing was wrong with me. However, the pigmentation spread further and by the beginning of 2017 I had noticed that I was constantly exhausted, I lost my breath easily and quickly, I was waking up every morning with severe muscle cramps. Sometimes the muscle cramps in my legs were so severe that it hurt to walk. After seeing several doctors I was referred to a dermatologist at the hospital. On the day of my skin biopsy, I had a blood test which revealed some abnormalities. I was referred to a haematologist. A month later I had a bone marrow biopsy and two weeks later I was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. It was unexpected for everyone around me, however, for some reason, I had sensed that it was coming.”
“Have hope, hope goes a long way. I know that you may feel weak, you may cry yourself to sleep some nights, you may feel like a burden on your family at times. However, you have control over how you react. Live in the present. Go out in the fresh air. Read a book. Clear your mind. Allow yourself to FEEL and be real with yourself. Give your body a break. But have hope that this will pass and that you are strong enough for this. You are powerful and you have got this.”

Leukemia Survivor Is Now A Multimedia Journalist

Leukemia Survivor Is A Multimedia Journalist
Courtenea Brown was diagnosed with leukemia at age of 25. She has successfully defeated her disease. She is now a multimedia journalist.
 
The Diagnosis
 
“At age 25. I was misdiagnosed initially because my primary didn’t run a blood test. Eventually, a hematologist diagnosed me and sent me to Montefiore hospital in the Bronx.”
 
The Journey
 
Leukemia Survivor's Journey
“I thought the psychological breakdown of getting out of a relationship was hard. I found out getting cancer is even worse. When I was told I have Leukemia, I had to ask the doctor if that’s Cancer. That’s how uneducated about my diagnosis I was. I cried immediately, instantly a dark cloud, clouded my sight. I’m only twenty-five, how could this be possible? I quickly thought, “This must be my death sentence”. I couldn’t stop crying for the life of me. Being admitted into the hospital for treatment one day lasted for a month. That’s when psychologically I was going through a battle. Uplifting my spirits became a challenge. Constantly reminding myself to be strong, life isn’t always fair. Sickness doesn’t come when you are ready, It has its own schedule. I had to check out of my old reality, in order to recognize my own strength in this new reality. I couldn’t reminisce about who I was before, what I might be missing, and what I had to give up. Cancer gave me a fresh start. Reaching within myself to gain a broader perspective on life. I had to pull myself out of the darkness, recognize my unrecognizable blessings. I’ve reached new heights going through cancer. There’s another form of people that not only I can see, but I also hear and feel. I’m a woman, who can relate to so many others. Now I can relate to those that know what it feels like to live with cancer. Now one of my main goals in life is empowerment, speaking with people that need help finding their voice, their purpose. I’ve been blessed with the voice of being a survivor. Through my own actions, I hope to inspire another survivor, whether they survived cancer, or a terrible break-up, or a relationship that would have left them dead. We are all survivors of something, recognizing that power, sometimes isn’t easily attainable, but very reachable. I triumph over the hurdles of leukemia, by not allowing them to become a roadblock in my life.”
 
Motivation to fight cancer
 
“To be there for my loved ones. To also be there for others that need to hear my stories. “
 
Biggest hindrance
 
“Accepting having cancer in the midst of my twenties.”
 
Message to cancer patients
 
Message for cancer patients
“Survival is more than physical; acceptance will be your best friend. There will be a time where you want to cry all the time, cry. Let it out! Believe in the bigger picture, belief in life!”

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Survivor Shares Her Tough Battle

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Survivor
 
“Cancer is only a chapter in my life, not my whole story.”
 
Leanne was diagnosed with blood cancer on 13th April 2018. She was diagnosed with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. She is successfully fighting her disease since then. You can also check out her blog where she has documented her journey.
 
The Diagnosis
 
“I was diagnosed with blood cancer on 13th April 2018 chronic myeloid Leukaemia! It’s a rare form of Leukaemia. Mainly in 65+ people, and In men, which came as a shock as I’m only 23 and a woman! I was diagnosed after an accident! For 2 weeks I thought I had pulled a muscle in my leg, Then one night I couldn’t sleep, I couldn’t even lie down as the pain was too much and my leg felt heavy and so sore. We rang 111 as my partner wanted me to go to the hospital and they made me an appointment for 2 hours later and told to call if anything else changes. As I waited I then projectile vomited and had blood in it so my partner drove me to the hospital. They wanted to take blood and my white blood cells came back too high they were 24, should be average 11. Then they put me on the award, then a consultant came and told us, this can be serious and that I need an emergency bone marrow biopsy, and it was getting done in 15 minutes! It was the most painful thing I’ve felt, 4 times they got in my bone but couldn’t get the marrow! Friday came and I felt so much better ! I thought it was gonna be a great day. We got to the hospital and they took blood, easily as well! – then I went in with the consultant he asked how my hip was from a bone marrow biopsy, I said I’m fine all is good Then he broke it to me “I’m sorry you have Leukaemia love” and told me it’s a “blood cancer” and it’s unusable! I was so heartbroken I just cried and cried, those 3 lines are all I heard and nothing else! I started treatment that night, chemo tablets, one a day every day for the rest of my life.”
 
The Journey
Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Survivor's Journey
“My journey has been hard, so hard! I had an unexpected hospital stay where I was an hour away from Neutropenic Sepsis! I had parainfluenza which is a common cold, whereas normal people can fight it off, but someone on chemo with a low immune system, unfortunately, can’t and that’s why Sepsis was happening! I was supposed to go on a cancer retreat but unfortunately, I was in the hospital. Knowing this can now be a common thing was scary! I write a blog 4 entry’s so far on how I’ve copped and side effects etc. and it’s helped me mentally, I have a counselor and such support around me! My aim is to have remission, so I’ll still have cancer but it’ll be under control, and to help young people with cancer or anyone in fact just so they know they’re not alone! Some days I’m strong other days weak but I always put on a brave face and don’t let it get the best of me! Side effects do make it hard, sickness, rashes, joint and muscle pains, bleeding gums.”
 
Motivation to fight cancer
 
“My motivation to fight my cancer is my life, my family. My future and the adventures I can have! – to see nieces and nephews and eventually my own children grow up!”
 
Biggest hindrance
 
“Biggest hurdles is fighting infections, keeping positive, staying strong when I’m so weak, and side effects from tablets.”
 
Message to other fighters
Message for cancer patients
“My message would be, I know it’s hard and I know you feel like giving up, as giving up means you have control over the cancer but you gotta keep the fight , it’s your fight, only you can do this, and you are strong enough to do this, you are stronger than you ever imagined and fight this, even if you can’t win, you know you’re a warrior, even incurable you keep fighting , you live your life and be proud of who you are !”

Leukemia Survivor Shares Her Inspiring Journey

Leukemia Survivor
 
“Don’t count the days, make the days count.”
 
Olivia Pexman was diagnosed with Leukemia in 2016. She has successfully defeated her disease.
 
The Diagnosis
 
“In 2015 I had two miscarriages and couldn’t understand why or what was happening. I was adamant I was going to get to the bottom of it so I kept going to the doctors trying to demand tests. They just kept passing it off saying I’m young and I have plenty of time but I didn’t want to just let it go. April 3rd 2016 they agreed to start looking into things so they called me in for a blood test to start things off. When the results came back I was called in and they told me they thought I had B12 deficiency, and they sent me away and told me to return in a month to see if my bloods came back the same then they would go from there. So May 5th I went in around 11 am had my bloods done and went home, 6 pm that same day I got a phone call from my doctor. She asked if I was at home, I said yes. She went on to tell me my bloods have come back and showing signs of leukemia. I could not tell you another word she said in that phone call as I just went completely numb. My mum tried to phone back once I got off the phone and told her she didn’t believe what I was saying, but the receptionist had said because it was after 6pm and I was over 18 she couldn’t talk to her. So I had to wait till my appointment the next day at 11.30 am. She just confirmed what she had said on the phone the night before and said I would be receiving a phone call from castle hill hospital in hull within the next few days. Friday 7th of May 2016 I was admitted to have a bone marrow biopsy and I didn’t leave after that for 7 weeks. I was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia.”
 
The Journey
 
Leukemia Survivor's Journey
“My journey has been up and down, I’ve always been a very positive person so I tried not to let it phase me too much but obviously I had days when I just couldn’t. I started off having 4 rounds of chemotherapy each being about 4 weeks long. So I was staying in hospital 4-6 weeks and having 2 weeks at home in-between each cycle. I went into remission after my first round of chemo but I still had a gene that would just bring it straight back if I didn’t have the other 3 rounds so I plodded on and had the other 3. My last chemo was September 2016, when my bone marrow results came back, I was leukaemia free but still had 0.5% of this gene left but they wanted to see what happened if they stopped treatment and monitored me very closely with biopsies every 8 weeks. February 2017 I relapsed, to me this was worse than being diagnosed in the beginning as I knew what I was up against. So this time round my plan was different, I was to have 1 round of the strongest chemo there is at hull and then radiotherapy, chemo and a bone marrow transplant in Nottingham. I had genuinely never been so scared in all my life. I was 21 years old and I didn’t know what was round the corner for me. Going through this journey took away the person I was, it drained the life out of me and not just because I was physically exhausted. I can honestly say I am 15 months post-transplant now and I’m only just getting back to myself and finding who I used to be.”
 
Motivation to fight cancer
 
“My motivation to fight cancer was for my family, my fiancé and for the people I’ve lost to this awful illness. I wanted to kick it for them as well as myself and for the fact I was 21 and wasn’t ready to give up.”
 
Biggest hindrance
 
“Relapsing after I thought it was all over, and having to go through it all a second time. The transplant was the hardest part it took me over a year to recover from it.”
 
Message to other cancer patients
 
Message for cancer patients
“Be positive, stay strong and don’t stop smiling.”

Leukemia Survivor Is Now A Fitness Enthusiast

Leukemia Survivor Is Now A Fitness Enthusiast
 
You have to be “Courageous through Cancer”
 
Via was diagnosed with Leukemia in October 2014. She has successfully defeated her disease. She is a fitness enthusiast and is living life to the fullest.
 
The Diagnosis
 
“She was diagnosed in Oct 2014 with Leukemia.
 
The Journey
 
Leukemia Survivor's Journey
“I was sick for a while. Leukemia works fast in bone marrow so I didn’t have much time to even think. I went to my doctor and he said you’re just overweight and I said NO something else is wrong. Weight does not bruise me or make my gums bleed, etc. And by that time I had two little ones (5 + 2) and I was working and going to school full time. I was trying so hard to keep up at the same pace, but I could feel it in my bones that I was sick. The doctor called the next day, his receptionist literally freaked me out. I could hear her tone over the phone. Something was worse than what I had expected, so I asked her. She said it was anemia. I thought to myself people don’t die from anemia why is she so sad. When I arrived, the doctor sat me down and told me I had Leukemia and My hemoglobin was 5.0 and I wouldn’t make it last one more day without a blood transfusion. My life changed forever that day.”
 
Motivation to fight cancer
 
“To live and to not die.”
 
Biggest hindrance
 
“2 relapses. Finances. Hope.”
 
Message to other fighters
 
Message for cancer patients
“When you feel alone, that’s why you reach for the skies. You ask someone somewhere for supernatural strength and when you get your wings, you’ll understand why you were chosen for this road. Don’t give up. Have courage and fight the good fight.”

Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma Survivor Becomes An Artist

Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma Survivor Becomes An Artist
 
“Tragedy should be utilized as a source of strength – I saw this once on Instagram from another cancer patient, you must use what life throws at you to become the best person you can.”
 
Brontë was diagnosed with Leukemia in Nov 2015. She has now successfully defeated her disease. She is now an artist and creates beautiful images.
 
The Diagnosis
 
“November 2015, I was in my final year of university and I got what I thought was a bad cold. This was misdiagnosed as a chest infection and I was given antibiotics. After a couple of days of only getting worse, chronic pain in my right side and back, vomiting, unable to eat, unable to breathe, my mum took me to A&E. I was admitted to the respiratory ward with what they thought was pneumonia but after a week in hospital, lots of tests, scans, X-rays and biopsy, it turned out t be collapsed lung from a mass (tumor) pressing against my lung. I was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic lymphoma, a type of leukemia.”
 
The Journey
 
Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma Survivor's Journey
“My journey has been indescribable, truly traumatic. On Christmas Eve of 2015, whilst undergoing intensive chemotherapy, I had a stroke which caused me to have lots of terrifying seizures. I spent Christmas in the ICU (intensive care unit), unable to move. I lost the use of the right side of my body. I had to teach myself with a talented team of physiotherapists and doctors on how to move again. I was truly so ill, and it’s so scary to think about that time, I still have night traumas now and suffer from PTSD because of the vivid memories I have. My parents really were my angels they looked after me every single second, from helping me shower to shaving my head, to dressing me, to hold me whilst I cried. Looking back at photos we took throughout treatment, it’s crazy to remember that it was me, not that long ago. At the end of my intensive treatment, we put together a fundraiser for teenage cancer trust and click Sargent two charities that helped me throughout my journey and are still supporting me today with one to one support. We raised £5000 and my friends and family all came together to celebrate this as a great moment. Living with cancer treatment for a prolonged period of time is a serious physical and mental strain and battle and everyone who has experienced it or is experiencing it will understand. Waking up knowing you are going to feel ill and you don’t know when it will end is a distressing thing. But I am living proof that you can make it through and it will get better. I am only now coming out of the other side and reevaluating who I am and what I want to do with the life I’ve fought to keep. Somehow, after everything, life is still terrifying. But I am so glad I am here to experience it.”
 
Motivation to fight cancer
 
“My family mainly. My mum and dad and my boyfriend. My best friend who came and visited me every week. Even when I felt too ill to see anyone, she would turn up and just sit silently with me, mostly whilst I slept. My boyfriend too. They came and spent New Year’s Eve with me on the ward. We played games until my chemo finished and I started being sick. The people that were there for you at those moments are the only ones that truly understand you. Having my treatment in the teenage cancer trust wards in Bristol made such a difference to my state of mind. It became a safe haven for me and when they told me I had to leave, I cried for hours. My motivation was also the people around me and thinking about the future and what I wanted to do, it kept me striving for it.”
 
The biggest hindrance
 
“The stroke as previously mentioned, as it was a big setback and I had to have therapy because I was constantly having anxiety attacks of it happening again. I am now able to rationalize these thoughts when I have them. I was also admitted later in the year with a sinus infection which caused my face to swell completely on one side! I can look back and laugh at the photos now but the reality of the pain was awful. On maintenance, I struggled with the steroids, as my body would swell, I would be red as a tomato, highly strung, light sensitivity, migraines, heightened sense of smell, hearing, and taste, depressive thoughts and a lot of crying. Being on these for two years started to get pretty draining and tiring on my body and mind. During the summer of 2017, I also got some sort of gastritis when my chemo dose was increased and for a couple of months, I was sick pretty much every day, and couldn’t eat and had gripping stomach pains. This again was not only physically exhausting but mentally too, especially, for a girl that loves her food and now had no desire for anything at all. Even smell would make me sick.”
 
Message to other cancer patients
 
“Nurture your body with as much love as you can. Surround yourself with positive people who feed you good energy for your fight. Nurture your soul through mindfulness, yoga and walks in nature. Be outside in nature and let the flow of air and the trickling of a stream heal your heart. Rest your body as much as possible so it can heal, do not push yourself. Start doing art even if you are not artistic. Start a journal to capture your journey, and keep your mind busy whilst your body recovers. I embrace you all, I stand by you. Find the strength inside you that will drive you through to the other side wherever that may be.”

Acute Myeloid Leukemia [AML] Fighter Is A Certified Farrier

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Fighter Is A Certified Farrier
 
“Never let the fear of striking out, keep you from playing the game.” – A Cinderella Story
 
 
Taylor Lynn is a certified Farrier and was diagnosed with Leukemia. Currently, she is in remission and is waiting for a stem cell transplant.
 
The Diagnosis
 
“February 28th, 2018. I was feeling sick for a month, went to the hospital thinking it was the flu. I spent 4 days in there trying to figure out what was wrong. I had mono, a UTI and was anemic. They did further blood tests and it was confirmed I had 3 leukemia cells, after which I was transported to Hahnemann Hospital. I then got a bone marrow biopsy which confirmed it was Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)”.
 
The Journey
Acute Myeloid Leukemia Fighter's Journey
“My journey with cancer is definitely life changing and taught me the biggest lesson. Never take advantage of life and how beautiful it is. Always love and be humble. Between the sickness, crying, aggravation and pain; I’ve always stayed positive and knew that I was going to beat this. I’m currently in remission and waiting for a stem cell transplant. One day closer to a life without cancer”.
 
Motivation to fight cancer
 
“My strong support system of my family and friends. They have been there since day 1 and haven’t given up on me. So, if they haven’t given up, I shouldn’t either”.
 
Biggest Hindrances
 
“The Hickman in my chest. It stops me from being able to do so many things”.
 
Message to other Fighters
 
“Fight, fight and FIGHT. YOU CAN WIN! It’s all about a positive attitude during the process. You have to believe every day that you will come out of this a survivor. You have to tell yourself every day that you are strong, and that nothing can stop you, not even the cancer. Live your life and live it with beauty and love. Stay humble, always and don’t let the little things get to you. You’re a star so keep on shining!”

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