fbpx

Psychological | Emotional

Please   Login / Register   to post or reply on the squad.

Home Forums Colorectal Cancer Psychological | Emotional

This topic contains 14 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by AndrePalis andrepalis 2 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #9678
    AndrePalis
    andrepalis
    Participant

    My mom passed away today from colon cancer. We found out she had it 2 weeks ago. It spread too fast and attacked her kidneys, liver, gotten her lymph nodes and to her brain. She passed this morning at 8:15 a.m. The world seems so empty without her.

    1
    0
  • #7566

    Cancer therapy/support

    Hi everyone!

    I would like to advise anyone going through their cancer battle to check with their oncologists and treatment providers for emotional assistance.

    I was offered free cancer art therapy classes and private/family therapy. All of these helped me to process my experiences with the cancer battle.

    It’s shocking to realize how much we and our loved ones carry from our battle. Going to therapy helps us to process our sadness,shock, grief and feelings of helplessness both during and after our battle.

    And it’s helpful to be surrounded by others in various parts of the battle share their experiences. Even if you have fought with a positive attitude, like myself, there was still underlying issues for me to process.

    So remember at your next appointment take a moment to ask your care providers for the resources offered in your clinic and area to help bolster you in your cancer battle!

    Sending wishes of wellness and light!
    Feel free to post any questions or comments about your experiences with emotional support for cancer treatments.

    0
    0
  • #5668
    CancerLion
    cancerlion
    Participant

    @david-morrison, I hate that you have to be going through this. Please don’t hesitate to get professional help (in whatever manner that would be for you, for me it was a therapist and ultimately some medication which I wish I had done sooner), in order to help you cope better with everything you are going through. I was surprised at how much just venting about my life to a person totally out of my circle made me feel so much better! Thinking about you!

    1
    0
    • #5845
      David.Morrison
      david-morrison
      Participant

      Thanks for sharing your experience with me @cancerlion. I know I have to accept the fact and fight my fears. Are you a survivor?

      0
      0
      • #5859
        CancerLion
        cancerlion
        Participant

        @david-morrison, yes, I’ve been clean since 2014 and I was stage 3C with lymph node involvement so my worst fear is what you are going through right now. It’s easy to be on this side saying be tough and all will be good but please do what you need to do to let the fear, anger and frustration out. My favorites were screaming into a pillow (or pillows) at the top of my lungs and beating up my mattress (I have a beast of a hammer fist!). Thinking of you!

        1
        0
      • #5996
        David.Morrison
        david-morrison
        Participant

        Good to know that you are clean. Yea sometimes I also punch my fist against the wall to get rid of some frustration. But at the end of the day, you can’t change the reality by screaming. We have to face the reality and prepare for the big challenges. I have tighten up my seat belt and I am ready to go for a long drive.

        1
        0
  • #5245
    David.Morrison
    david-morrison
    Participant

    I had been feeling pain in the right side of my abdomen for last few days. I got an ultrasound done recently which showed some nodules in my liver. Doctor advised a CT scan that showed a mass in my large intestine. Biopsy confirmed it to be a cancer which has spread to liver.
    I was not ready for this at all. And still I am not able to accept the fact. I don’t know what to do and how to react. Feeling totally helpless.

    0
    0
    • #5282
      Linda
      linda
      Participant

      I’m so sorry you’re going through this. I understand the shock and helplessness that you are feeling. I felt similarly when I was diagnosed with colon cancer just this last April. It is a scary and difficult process. But you can get through it.

      For me so far, the most difficult period was the time between my diagnosis and my surgery. I never had surgery before, and greatly feared it. I won’t lie, the surgery was a challenge. I had great pain. It has now been 5 weeks since my surgery, and while the pain isn’t totally gone I’m feeling much better and have not needed prescription pain medicines for a few weeks. If you will be having surgery don’t be afraid. It may be unpleasant for a while, but you can get through it.

      Here are some things that have helped me:

      – Know your plan of care
      Learn more about colon cancer, find out from your doctors what your plan of care is. Talk to other people who have had to undergo similar treatments so you can know what to expect and learn tips on how to make yourself the most comfortable during treatment.

      – Reach out to others, build a support system
      Joining groups like the one here at cancerbro can help you to talk to others who also are facing colon cancer. The American Cancer Society also has many resources to find support on their website as well. There is another group, the Colon Cancer Alliance, that also has resources to help find support. Allow your friends and family to help you if they are offering. Sometimes just having someone to be with you when you’re feeling down can make a huge difference. If you are a follower of any religion, you can reach out to local churches/temples/mosques to find out if there are any support available. Many religious groups offer support and encouragement. You can also google Cancer Support Groups in your area. If you will be having surgery, see if there is someone nearby who can help you after you come home from the hospital for a short while. Talking to others about my fears, getting spiritual support, and hearing about others experiences helped me tremendously.

      – Develop an attitude of gratitude, focus on the good things
      Whenever I have a bad day where I am discouraged or fearful I make a list of 10 things I am grateful for. It can be anything… chocolate, sunrises, puppies, family, friends, anything at all. Just make a list. Think about all the things that you are thankful for. On some days it may be hard to do this. But do it. Even if you have trouble thinking of things. When you find your mind going into a dark and hopeless place, change it’s direction. Go on youtube and watch some funny videos, silly animals, comedians, whatever makes you laugh or smile. There are some things you cant control (cancer) but there are some things you can control (what your mind is dwelling on). Living in fear robs us of our joy. Today is a good day. Don’t let fears of tomorrow ruin today.

      – Allow yourself to grieve, be kind to yourself
      It is okay to grieve. It is okay to feel sad about being diagnosed with cancer. Don’t feel bad about feeling sad. You will have ups and downs. I’ve had days where I’ve felt sad, and have tried to focus on the positive like in my previous tip, but had a hard time. I was able to change what I was thinking about, but I still felt down anyway. That’s okay. If you find yourself feeling very depressed, or having trouble adjusting to your diagnosis, don’t be afraid to reach out for professional help. Talk to a therapist, ask your doctor for a psychological referral. There’s no shame in getting help with processing all of this.

      Most of all, hang in there!

      3
      0
      • #5846
        David.Morrison
        david-morrison
        Participant

        Your reply brought tears to my eyes @linda. I have noted down all your points which are really very helpful. I will try to follow all of them and see how it goes. How are you now btw? Are you cancer free now?

        0
        0
      • #5509
        Wonthebattle
        wonthebattle
        Participant

        @linda It’s good that in your case, Tumor was localised and surgery removed the disease. I hope and pray that you live the best of your life. And such a beautiful piece of advise you have given for fighters. Shows that you have so much awareness of your own body and mind.

        0
        0
    • #5280
      CancerFitt
      cancerfitt
      Participant

      @david-morrison I understand where you are coming from and it is a completely normal reaction to news like this. I want you to know this is no way way means this is the end. Technology and medicine have come a LONG ways. I found out I had cancer 2 weeks after my 28th birthday. I have had multiple surgeries both robotic and free hand. They took 80% of my colon, 20% of my liver, my gallbladder, part of my pancreas, lots of small intestine and some of my stomach Wall, about 22 hours under the knife and years of different chemo’s until we found what worked well. I’m now almost 32 still fighting it but have seen massive tumor reduction and am stronger than I have ever been (even when I was a 23 year old marine)! I seriously revamped my diet and started exercising regularly again. You can definitely come out on the other side of this stronger than you have ever been as well. Both mentally and physically. Stay strong brother!

      2
      0
      • #5516
        Wonthebattle
        wonthebattle
        Participant

        @cancerfitt I have also read that even if there is spread to liver, the disease is still curable. But have listened the first-hand experience from you today. This must have given @david-morrison a lot of hope. I was lucky to come out of it. I also do regular workout and have completely revamped my life after crossing on the other side. I have become much more stronger and fit.

        0
        0
    • #5266
      Wonthebattle
      wonthebattle
      Participant

      @david-morrison I can understand it must be very difficult for you, but don’t lose hope. Discuss with your family and friends, doing that will give you a lot of psychological relief. Discuss the treatment options available with your oncologist. Now a days, a lot of good treatment options are available for colorectal cancer. You have to keep fighting through this.

      1
      0
      • #5847
        David.Morrison
        david-morrison
        Participant

        Thanks @wonthebattle for your kind words. I am definitely trying my best to keep up with the stress and discussing all possible options with my doctors. I am planning to take it on a day to day basis.

        0
        0
  • #5069
    Cancer_bro
    cancer_bro
    Keymaster
    0
    0

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.