fbpx

Prevention | Risk Factors

Please   Login / Register   to post or reply on the squad.

Home Forums Colorectal Cancer Prevention | Risk Factors

This topic contains 15 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by EmmaRichards emmarichards 5 months, 2 weeks ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #7035
    EmmaRichards
    emmarichards
    Participant

    Hii @linda. congrats for not smoking for a very long time now. I hope you will continue it in future as well. You are an inspiration to all those who are trying to quit. Can you please guide me what did you do to successfully quit smoking? Thanks for you support 🙂

    0
    0
    • #7245
      Linda
      linda
      Participant

      Hi Emma, I had a hard time quitting smoking. I was smoking a pack of cigarettes a day, and I managed to reduce it to less than half a pack a day before I quit. Then I quit cold turkey. You have to want something else (such as health, and/or saving money) more than you want the cigarette. Also, you will need to find something else to do to replace smoking, such as chew gum, or something to do with your hands (crocheting, drawing, even just holding a pen instead of a cigarette). It also helps to still take breaks throughout the day. Instead of smoke breaks, just take a break to go for a short (smoke-free) walk to enjoy some fresh air. Avoid people who smoke, avoid temptation. If you need help, talk to your doctor. There are prescription medicines that can help, or maybe nicotine gum/patch might help if you have bad cravings. It does get easier over time, so hang in there. I wish you the best!

      • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by Linda linda.
      1
      0
      • #7306
        EmmaRichards
        emmarichards
        Participant

        Thanks for these useful tips @linda. From now on, I will try my level best to avoid temptations and follow your tips to quit smoking and take my first step towards better health. Really appreciate your help 🙂

        0
        0
  • #6693
    EmmaRichards
    emmarichards
    Participant

    I am a regular smoker for past 3 years but I am physically fit. I do regular exercises and run marathons. Recently, I saw in a documentary of colon cancer on YouTube where I came to know that smoking can increase the risk of developing colon and many other cancers. I was wondering if my smoking habit can lead to colon cancer as I do regular expercises too.

    0
    0
    • #6970
      Linda
      linda
      Participant

      @emmarichards Smoking can lead to many types of cancer as well as many unpleasant lung diseases. My grandmother smoked since she was a young adult, and had several lung diseases from it including emphysema/COPD. She passed away at the early age of 56 due to complications of her lung diseases. My grandfather developed terminal lung cancer, and he was a lifetime smoker. I’m glad you exercise, that shows that you want to be healthy. Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your health. Quitting smoking will also help your lungs to perform at their best and increase your performance for your marathons. I know it’s easier said than done, I smoked for 7 years and I know quitting is very hard, I had a difficult time but haven’t smoked in over 20 years now. You can do it if you choose to. I hope you will consider quitting smoking. ♥

      1
      0
  • #5794
    MarkTaylor_01
    marktaylor_01
    Participant

    Hii guys, I am 45 male and I recently read an article on American Cancer Society that being obese and eating certain type of diets like processed meats, red meat, etc. increases the risk of colorectal cancer. I don’t smoke and no one in my family has ever been diagnosed with any cancer. However, I am overweight, mostly physically inactive, and eat red meat a lot. Can these risk factors cause cancer? Should I go for colonoscopy to check? What do you all suggest? Thanks for helping in advance 🙂

    0
    0
    • #6083
      Cancer_bro
      cancer_bro
      Keymaster

      Hii @marktaylor_01, You can take a reference from this video. Hope it helps 🙂

      0
      0
    • #6080
      Cancer_bro
      cancer_bro
      Keymaster
      0
      0
    • #5854
      Linda
      linda
      Participant

      The American Cancer Society is now recommending colonoscopy screenings at age 45. Please talk to your doctor about getting one. I’m 43 and just had a right hemicolectomy a few weeks ago to remove a large tumor from my colon. It can happen at any age. I had no symptoms other than anemia. No family history, no genetic cause. I am overweight. My surgeon and oncologist have both recommended limiting red meat and processed meats, and avoid eating a lot of sugar. Cancer is an obligate glucose metabolizer. Sugar feeds cancer. Eating healthy is not a guarantee that you wont get cancer. There are a lot of people who eat very healthy and still have gotten cancer. But eating healthy will give your body the nutrients it needs and give you the best chance of overcoming disease.

      0
      0
      • #5893
        MarkTaylor_01
        marktaylor_01
        Participant

        Thanks for sharing your knowledge @linda. I guess it is better to go for colonscopy to get my answers. How are you doing btw?

        0
        0
    • #5837
      CancerLion
      cancerlion
      Participant

      I have heard and read all kinds of studies that suggest the same thing and some that debunk them. I believe they can but I am not a doctor. I am a vegetarian and ended up with rectal cancer so who knows! Please go get a colonoscopy as soon as you are able. I was diagnosed through a routine screening at 41 and I was having no symptoms or problems, just a family history. That screening literally saved my life. Please go do it!

      0
      0
      • #5897
        MarkTaylor_01
        marktaylor_01
        Participant

        Yes I guess that is the only option l have to know what’s going on inside my body. Thanks for sharing your story. Hope you are ok now 🙂

        0
        0
  • #5669
    CancerLion
    cancerlion
    Participant

    Eating healthy is the best way to go for overall health but I am a vegetarian and was diagnosed with Stage III rectal cancer. Yes, there was a family member but when they did genetic testing I don’t have the genes known for familial passing down. Please get checked out for the chronic constipation, at least make them do a test you take home and send off to be screened if they refuse a full colonoscopy.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by CancerLion cancerlion.
    0
    0
  • #5244
    Jim_Taylor
    jim_taylor
    Participant

    I have read at many places that dietary factors play a major role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. I am really worried now as I have been on processed and junk food for last many years and too little of fruits or vegetables in my diet. I have chronic constipation now. Should i get myself checked out?

    0
    0
    • #5271
      Wonthebattle
      wonthebattle
      Participant

      @jim_taylor Definitely you should get yourself checked out thoroughly, this is my personal opinion. I did the same mistake of eating unhealthy and processed foods for lot of years. I was lucky to have been diagnosed with localised colon cancer and detected on time, and underwent surgery to remove my tumor. Also, I feel you should start making healthier changes in your diet and lifestyle. I did it gradually slowly replacing my unhealthy habits with healthy ones. I hope everything is fit and fine with you.

      0
      0
  • #5083
    Cancer_bro
    cancer_bro
    Keymaster
    0
    0

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.